#ReadFewerWhiteDudes


Post Author: Sara Gross Samuelson


mug reading "read fewer white dudes" on it on a shelf next to a pile of books by non-white authors

The author’s reading corner. Mug from Where Are You? Press, books from Powell’s books.

Two years ago, my good friend from seminary, Casey Kloehn, wrote this blog post inviting others to join in her reading challenge to #readfewerwhitedudes. It was one of those Holy Spirit moments, where her post and invitation came just as I was coming to grips with being told how white my reading list was. When the whiteness of my reading  list was first pointed out to me, I jumped to defending my choices in my head. “These are good books! I’m a smart person! I’m trying to buy books that will help me be a better pastor and this is what’s available!” But then I remembered: I live in one of the whitest cities in the United States. And I’m a pastor in one of the whitest denominations in the United States.  As much as I wanted to stay in my comfort of being able to order the professional and personal books that seemed to “fit what I needed” at the time…. It seemed like Spirit was urging, drawing, pulling me into this invitation to include diverse voices in the books that I was reading. (And, the excuse to order another motivational coffee mug for my office certainly didn’t hurt.)

 

After the first few months or so, I noticed some changes. First, I would get asked more often about what I was reading and was able to share recommendations more readily than before because of the intention I was holding in my reading habits. Some of this was admittedly because I unashamedly drink coffee from a mug (pictured) ordered from the independent publishing company that inspired Casey’s original hashtag. But some of it is also because people ask their pastor what they are reading.

 

This season of reading fewer white dudes has brought with it a season of talking about books from voices that were stirring something new in me. Which brings me to the second change—I noticed just how much my reading habits get into my head, heart, and bones. Before this challenge, I hadn’t realized how much my inner voice lacked diversity and imagination until I got called out on it and nudged into making this shift. If we believe in the power of written words to move us, then believing that what we read matters follows naturally. And as leaders, what we read matters.

 

There is a quiet and powerful prophetic task in not only reading with intention, but sharing our reading with others. Sharing openly about the #readfewerwhitedudes challenge started to feel like a very pastoral task, even if most of this reading was what I would consider “not for work.” For better or for worse, there are pieces of our lives as pastors that get exposed to the people we lead. While plenty of times there is space for us to discern how much or how little we share about our personal habits, I’ve decided my reading list is best kept open to the public. It keeps me accountable to those voices on the margin, and in sharing my story about why I #readfewerwhitedudes, I’m able to be open with others about naming and owning my privilege and power as a middle class, heterosexual, cisgender white woman. Some of that privilege and power needs to be checked with these marginal voices. And some of it has been able to do the work of standing up to the white hetero patriarchy by continuing to drink from my motivational mug, even when it has caused offense.

Two years after that first challenge, and I’m starting another annual booklist. Since that first list, I have resigned my first call, spent some time in Sabbath wilderness, birthed a baby and begun dabbling with a grassroots spiritual community forming in my neighborhood. Last week I got asked the question again “What are you reading?” And I stopped to share about #readfewerwhitedudes. All the while, aware that I still live in one of the whitest cities in the United States. And I’m still a pastor in one of the whitest denominations in the United States. I’m continuing this year to #readfewerwhitedudes. I’m reading fewer white dudes and more women, Asians, Native Americans, Black, Queer, Trans, Latinx writers  because as a leader I need voices in my head and my heart that will move me forward when Spirit pushes me towards justice. I’m reading fewer white dudes because I want to be able to share openly with others a habit of mine that feels honest and authentic and intentional. I’m doing it to claim small moments of being something other than status quo in a world that seeks ease and comfort. So, dear YCW and friends, want to #readfewerwhitedudes with me?

 


The Rev. Sara Gross Samuelson lives in Milwaukie, Oregon, with her husband Josh, dog Copper and 4-month-old son. Sara has a long history working in outdoor ministry, has memorized unseemly chunks of dialogue from Aaron Sorkin’s productions, is openly prideful of the Pacific Northwest and its outdoor wonderlands, and has a complicated relationship with her book-buying habits.

She is ordained in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and is currently dabbling as a pastor/leader/organizer in a grassroots spiritual community in her neighborhood.


Image by: Sara Gross Samuelson
Used with permission
1 reply
  1. Tara K Shepersky
    Tara K Shepersky says:

    Thanks very much for sharing this.

    I’ve been resistant to this hashtag, because, although the idea behind it (read more diverse books!) is so good, the label itself seems to feed into a sort of scarcity mentality: you don’t have time to read everything, so just skip the white dudes! It seems to go out of its way to provoke a sort of defensive, Not-All-Men reaction. And we all know how those miss the point.

    As I read your post, though, I’m thinking about how we DO have to make choices that limit our other choices. That’s not necessarily about scarcity, it’s about priority, and it’s about choosing who we want to become.

    (Credit where it’s due, this post right here, which is part of a blog I enjoy, is the cross-reference I’m using: https://www.nicoledieker.com/…/your-choices-limit-your…/)

    As for provocation…well, that is in itself instructive.

    So thanks for your words. They’re contributing something important to the conversation around reading and diversity.

    Reply

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